Intranasal Dexmedetomidine as Sedative for Non-Invasive Pediatric Diagnostic Procedures Outside Operating Room

Authors

  • Ahmed Bilal Akhtar
  • Muhammad Khurram Ijaz
  • Adeel Bashir
  • Ahsun Waqar Khan

DOI:

https://doi.org/10.21649/akemu.v28i2.5083

Keywords:

Intranasal, dexmedetomidine, pediatric, diagnostic, sedative, non-invasive

Abstract

Background: Children often require sedation for long non-invasive diagnostic procedures. Dexmedetomidine is a highly selective alpha 2-adrenoceptor agonist with sedative, anxiolytic and analgesic properties. It mimics natural sleep and allows patients to easily arouse with minimal effects on respiration and airway patency. Objective: To assess the successful completion of pediatric non-invasive diagnostic procedures with intranasal dexmedetomidine as a sedative agent. Methods: Seventy-nine subjects of age six months to twelve years scheduled for non-invasive diagnostic procedures were included. Dexmedetomidine (4 mcg/kg) was administered intranasally 25 minutes before the scheduled time of procedure. A sedation score of two or above as per the MICHIGAN sedation scale was considered satisfactory for starting the procedure. Results: Seventy-four (95%) out of the seventy-nine subjects were successfully sedated with Intranasal dexmedetomidine (p<0.0001). The mean time and Standard deviation to achieve sedation was 18.9 ± 2.82 mins. The median time was 19 mins with a range from 15-25 minutes. Post anesthesia discharge time for Intranasal dexmedetomidine was 20 minutes with zero incidence of post procedure nausea and vomiting. Conclusions: Intranasal dexmedetomidine can be used as an alternative to General anesthesia for non-invasive diagnostic procedures outside operating room with less adverse effects in this cohort.

Published

2022-07-19 — Updated on 2022-08-04

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How to Cite

Akhtar, A. B. ., Ijaz, M. K. ., Bashir, A. ., & Khan, A. W. . (2022). Intranasal Dexmedetomidine as Sedative for Non-Invasive Pediatric Diagnostic Procedures Outside Operating Room. Annals of King Edward Medical University, 28(2), 188-192. https://doi.org/10.21649/akemu.v28i2.5083 (Original work published July 19, 2022)

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Articles