Effects of Serum Leptin on Lung Functions in Obese and Non Obese Adults

  • Sabah Usman
  • Muhammad Younus
  • Samia Jawed
Keywords: Serum leptin, Spirometry, Lung function test, Body mass index.

Abstract

Background: Leptin is a hormone produced by adipose tissue. Its level is directly associated with the total mass of fat cells in the body. Higher leptin levels are associated with decreased lung functions. Objective: To determine serum leptin levels in our obese and non obese population and to correlate the bodymass index (BMI), and serum leptin levels with pulmonary function tests (PFT's). Methods: This case control analytical study was conducted at the Institute of Chest Medicine, King Edward Medical University, Lahore, Pakistan. One hundred and twenty individuals – 60 obese (30 males, 30 females) 60 non-obese (30 males, 30 females) fulfilling the inclusion criteria were enrolled through non-probability purposive sampling. The data was collected from the medical students, employees of KEMU/Mayo Hospital and the attendants of the patients presenting to the hospital. Informed written consent was taken from all subjects. The demographic information of these subjects like name, age, sex, height, weight, and BMI were recorded. Spirometry of all the subjects was performed on Spirolab iii. Fasting blood samples were taken for the measurement of serum leptin levels. Results: The mean serum Leptin in obese was 16.59 ± 13.56 ng/ml and in non-obese cases,it was5.58 ± 6.30 ng/ml with p-value < 0.0001.In obese cases significant negative correlation was found in serum leptin with Forced Vital Capacity (FVC) (r = - 0.459, p-value < 0.0001) and with Forced Expiratory Volume (FEV1) (r= - 0.369, p-value 0.004). Conclusions: It is concluded that serum leptin level was higher in obese subjects as compared to the nonobese subjects and increase in serum leptin level was associated with decrease in lung functions (FVC andFEV1).
Published
2018-09-12
Section
Articles