Wound Complications Due to Obesity in the Patients Undergoing Abdominal Surgery

Ammar Rasool, Yar Muhammad, Khalid Masood Gondal, Umair Ahmed Khan

Abstract


Various factors may affect the outcome of patients in perioperative period. Obesity is considered as one of these factors which increases the risk of perioperative complications. The wound complications in obese and non-obese are different.

Objective:  The objective of the study was to compare wound complications in obese and non-obese patients undergoing abdominal surgery.

Methods:  This comparative study was conducted from 01- 05-2012 to 30-04-2015 on 140 patients in the department of surgery, Mayo Hospital Lahore. All these patients were divided into two groups of 70 patients each. Group A (obese) and B (nonobese) on the basis of body mass index. The patients of age less than 12 years, peritonitis, diabetes mellitus, jaundice, renal failure, coagulation disorder were excluded in both groups. All the patients had open and laparoscopic surgery by the consultant on elective list. The operative and postoperative findings and outcome in term of wound complications like wound infection, dehiscence, seroma, hernia, were noted.

Results:  All the140 patients were divided into group A (obese) and B (non obese) of 70 patients each. The age ranged from 17 to 58 years and males were common (50.8%) than females (49.2%). In group A, body mass index varied from 31.9kg m-2 to 39.08kg m-2 and in group B from 19.3kg m-2 to 23.2kg m-2. The complications in group A were wound infection in 18, dehiscence in 5, seroma in 13, and hernia 4 patients. While in group B, the complications were wound infection in 3, seroma in 5, no dehiscence and incisional hernia in one patient. The results showed that early and late wound complications are more in obese patients.

Conclusion:  The wound complications are significantly associated with obesity in patients undergoing abdominal surgery and are more in obese than in non obese patients.


Keywords


Obese, Wound, Complications, Abdominal Surgery.

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21649/akemu.v23i1.1501

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(C) Annals of KEMU, King Edward Medical University, Lahore, Pakistan.