A Comparison of Quality of Life and Support Mechanisms After Childhood Burn Injures in Asian and European Countries: A Systematic Review

Muhammad Haisum Maqsood, Sungeen Khan, Saira Afzal

Abstract


Background:  Childhood burns are the leading cause of unintentional injuries, with more incidences in Asian than in European countries. This systematic review aims to compare the differences in extent and type of burns in children from Europe and Asia, along with the differences in the coping strategies and the quality of life these children possess after the event of the burn.

Methods:  This systematic review was conducted along the PRIMSA guidelines. We systematically searched DOAJ, Google Scholar, Ingentaconnect, Jurg, Popline, Prof Search, Pubmed, Pubmed Abstract, Pubpsych, Pakmedinet and PMC on 10th May 2016. Studies were selected if they met the following criteria: (1) must be based in Asia or Europe (2) must be related to burns (3) must be related to children (4) must not be treatment specific (5) must be in English (6) must be a published in a journal (not in a

conference). A self-made proforma was used to extract data for mean duration of hospitalization, extent of burns, coping strategy, quality of life of paediatric burn victims, psychosocial effects, family of burn victims, educational impact post burn in children, posttraumatic stress disorder among burned children and altered pain sensations among burned children.Findings:  European children are more likely to be burnt by scalds than Asian children. European children suffer from superficial burns whereas Asian children suffer from deep burns. Situation in Asian children is intensified by the fact that there are fewer burn centres per capita and have low funds for post-burn care. In addition to it, many burnt children are not hospitalized in Asian countries. Parents of burnt children from both continents show immense feeling of guilt and inadequacy. Almost one-fifth of European burnt children suffered from post traumatic stress disorder. There is altered perception of pain in children who had experienced burns. European burn centres are more concerned about psychological aspects of children whereas there is a trend of child abuse in Asian countries.

Interpretations:  A greater body of research is carried out on this issue in European countries, showing an eagerness on behalf of the health community to provide superior care for the victims of burns.

Background:  Childhood burns are the leading cause of unintentional injuries, with more incidences in Asian than in European countries. This systematic review aims to compare the differences in extent and type of burns in children from Europe and Asia, along with the differences in the coping strategies and the quality of life these children possess after the event of the burn.

Methods:  This systematic review was conducted along the PRIMSA guidelines. We systematically searched DOAJ, Google Scholar, Ingentaconnect, Jurg, Popline, Prof Search, Pubmed, Pubmed Abs-tract, Pubpsych, Pakmedinet and PMC on 10th May 2016. Studies were selected if they met the following criteria: (1) must be based in Asia or Europe (2) must be related to burns (3) must be related to children (4) must not be treatment specific (5) must be in English (6) must be a published in a journal (not in a

conference). A self-made proforma was used to extract data for mean duration of hospitalization, extent of burns, coping strategy, quality of life of paediatric burn victims, psychosocial effects, family of burn victims, educational impact post burn in children, post-traumatic stress disorder among burned children and altered pain sensations among burned children.Findings:  European children are more likely to be burnt by scalds than Asian children. European children suffer from superficial burns whereas Asian children suffer from deep burns. Situation in Asian children is intensified by the fact that there are fewer burn centres per capita and have low funds for post-burn care. In addition to it, many burnt children are not hospitalized in Asian countries. Parents of burnt children from both continents show immense feeling of guilt and inade-quacy. Almost one-fifth of European burnt children suffered from post traumatic stress disorder. There is altered perception of pain in children who had expe-rienced burns. European burn centres are more con-cerned about psychological aspects of children whe-reas there is a trend of child abuse in Asian countries.

Interpretations:  A greater body of research is car-ried out on this issue in European countries, showing an eagerness on behalf of the health community to provide superior care for the victims of burns.


Keywords


Childhood burn Extent of Childhood Burn∙Childhood Burns in Europe ∙Childhood Burns in Asia∙Childhood Burns and Quality of Life∙Types of Childhood Burns Quality of Life after Treatment of Childhood Burns in Europe and in Asia Childhood burns in Developed C

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DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.21649/akemu.v22i4.1451

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(C) Annals of KEMU, King Edward Medical University, Lahore, Pakistan.